Category: Best Practices

Getting Down to the Details for Departmental Reviews/Inspections

Do you sometimes wish others would just leave you and your staff alone, so you could get on with interacting with your residents, and provide great programs for them? Sure you do. However, like everyone in the care process, we are accountable. So whether it is your manager, your care team, family members or inspectors,…
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The Benefits and Balance of Tracking Self Directed Activities

As a recreationist, you are committed to providing a wide range of programs that are relevant to your residents’ needs and interests. At the same time, many of your clients also engage in other leisure time pursuits that are not on your calendar (we call them self directed activities) – and that is fantastic. Some…
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Responding to Family Members’ “On-the Spot” Questions

Let’s paint the picture: one staff member is off sick today and you are covering for her; you are in the middle of setting up materials and the room for the next program (one that you personally haven’t run for years!); a volunteer for this afternoon’s program called in to say she couldn’t make it…
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Sharing Your Knowledge with Administrators and Other Staff

As recreationists, we need and want to share information about our residents, programs and department with others. While we know what is important to us, what we think is important, or great, may not always be the best message to send to others. Let’s take a look at effective “messaging” with two different groups –…
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Family Care Conference: YOUR Opportunity to Shine!

When family members (or the resident’s significant others) are present at care conferences, you have a wonderful opportunity to demonstrate how effective you and your staff have been in not only reaching the resident with excellent programs, but also to reinforce the positive impact your programs are having on the life and well-being of the…
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Proving the Quality of Resident Engagement

For too many years, recreationists have simply relied on tabulating the frequency of resident participation in programs to validate success. In other words, the more often a resident attended programs, the better. Unfortunately such a measure doesn’t represent the quality of engagement, particularly if the resident sleeps through the program, or is distracted and disruptive.…
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Making Tech the Recreationist’s Friend & Ally

Considerations for Both Tech Adopters and Luddites There are two very different types of technology users today: (1) those who love all things “tech” and don’t understand how anyone could exist today without looking at a device (including laptops, smartphones, tablets, etc.) at least 23 times/day; and (2) those who wish they could revert to…
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Setting the Right Benchmarks for Your Home

While most of us try to do our best every day, as human beings we are also subject to periodic “slippage.” For example, has anyone else out there made a commitment to lose weight and exercise more…but have let that one slip away? I don’t think I am alone on that one! One of the…
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Person-Centered Programming – Meeting Residents Where They Are

As recreation specialists, we know that it is our responsibility to provide programs that residents want and need. However, there are times when we find a resident is not suited to a particular program – they are unable to do what is is being asked (it may be because it is an unfamiliar task, or…
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What Are Your Expected Outcomes?

When creating an new program, you are likely expected to create a program profile, or description. Usually this includes core details, such as program Goals, Procedures (how to run the program) and Requirements (needed equipment, supplies, staff, volunteers, contacts, etc.). When creating your programs with ActivityPro, or even on paper, the identification of Expected Outcomes…
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